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Halibut Poke Bowl

4 generous servings
Lunch

Characteristics

Ethnic Cuisine High Fibre

Nutritional Facts Per Serving

507
Calories
24.7 g
Protein
63.2 g
Carbs
6.4 g
Fibre
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Nutritional Facts

4 generous servings
  • Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
  • Calories 507
  • Fat 17.8 g 27 %
    • Saturated   2.7 g
    • + Trans 0 g 3 %
  • Cholesterol 46 mg
  • Sodium   1554 mg 85 %
  • Carbohydrate 63.2 g 21 %
    • Fibre   6.4 g 26 %
    • Sugars   9.5 g
  • Protein 24.7 g
    • Vitamin A 6 %
    • Vitamin C 27 %
    • Calcium 3 %
    • Iron 11 %

Method

To make the poke (see Note), combine its first eight ingredients in a large bowl. Add the halibut and gently toss. Cover, refrigerate and marinate fish 4 hours, turning occasionally.

One hour before the halibut is done marinating, place the rice in a small pot and cover with cold water. Use your hands and rub the grains together to remove excess starch from the rice. Drain the water from the rice.

Add 1 3⁄4 cups of fresh cold water to the pot. Bring the rice to a boil over high heat, and then turn the heat to its lowest setting. Cover and steam the rice until tender, about 15 minutes.

While the rice cooks, place its vinegar, sugar and salt in a second small pot. Bring to a boil for a few seconds to dissolve the sugar. Remove from the heat.

When cooked, spoon and spread the rice into a large, shallow-sided pan. Stir in the vinegar mixture and then cool rice to room temperature.

To serve the poke, add the Fresno (or jalapeño) pepper, nuts, avocado and mint to the marinated fish and gently toss to combine.  Divide the rice between 4 bowls. Divide and top with the halibut poke mixture. Garnish each bowl with some pea shoots and serve.

                                         

Options: Instead of halibut, try making the poke with another type of boneless fish, such as ahi tuna loin. 

Note: Poke is a highly flavoured Hawaiian-style raw (not cooked!), marinated fish dish with Asian-style tastes, such as soy and sesame. It’s often served as an appetizer, but this version of it, which is served over sushi-style rice, is a little more substantial and makes a nice light lunch or dinner.

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